NEWSEVENTSDIRECTORIESSEARCH UBCUBC CopyrightmyUBC LOGIN
Home
About Us
People
Global Focus
Research
Visiting Scholars
Postdoctoral Fellows
PhD Students
Networks & Groups
Master of Public Policy
IR Program
Lind Initiative
Room Booking
Lobby Gallery
Events
RUSSIA, CHINA URGE START TO SPACE WEAPONS TALKS
Description: GENEVA (Reuters) - Russia and China declared on Tuesday that rapidly advancing technology made it increasingly urgent to start international talks on banning all weaponry from outer space to prevent an arms race....speaking during a two-day seminar o
Date: 21 March 2005
Author: Simons Centre co-sponsor of seminar on the space arms issue
Source: Reuters
RUSSIA, CHINA URGE START TO SPACE WEAPONS TALKS

Tue Mar 22, 2005 10:24 AM ET

By Robert Evans



GENEVA (Reuters) - Russia and China declared on Tuesday that rapidly advancing technology made it increasingly urgent to start international talks on banning all weaponry from outer space to prevent an arms race.



But senior diplomats from the two powers said they were still awaiting a response from the United States -- which argues that no such treaty is needed -- on compromise proposals for negotiations they presented nearly two years ago.



"It is urgent to stop the weaponisation of outer space and maintain it for the peaceful use of all humankind," Hu Xiaodi, China's ambassador to the U.N.-sponsored Conference on Disarmament (CD), told a news briefing.



Russia's deputy chief negotiator at the 65-nation CD, Anton Vasilyev, said it was vital "to start working out a legally-binding instrument (treaty) .... to prohibit the deployment of any kinds of weapons in space".



They were speaking during a two-day seminar on the space arms issue that their two countries organised with the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research and a leading Canadian research centre, the Vancouver-based Simons Centre.



Officials said the U.S. administration did not attend the meeting, although some independent academic bodies from the United States, along with scholars and industry representatives from several other countries, were present.



"It is clear that views on this issue in the United States are divided ," Wade Huntley of the Simons Centre, which focuses on disarmament and non-proliferation issues at the University of British Columbia, told the briefing.



Officials from the U.S. Bush administration, which is creating a National Missile Defence System (NMD) against attacks from "rogue states" or terrorists, routinely insist that there is no danger of a space weapons race and that no treaty is needed.



In August 2003, China -- with backing from Russia which has already declared it would not be the first to put arms in space -- announced it was ready for talks even if they were not specifically aimed at producing a binding treaty.



Previously, Beijing had insisted that there must be formal negotiations within the CD -- currently holding the first of its three annual 10-week sessions -- on a space arms pact, a project which has been in the air for more than a decade.



"Since we offered our compromise, the United States has kept silent on whether it could agree to a modest mandate (for talks) and not made its position clear," said China's Hu.



"We still keep hoping that our efforts in this field will be duly reciprocated," declared Vasilyev.


ITAR-TASS News Agency (Russia)
Financial Times (London and Asia Editions)
ANSA English Media Service
Xinhua News Agency (China)
Reuters, picked up by San Diego Union Tribune (US), ABC online (Australia), Xtra MSN (New Zealand)




For more information on the "Safeguarding Space Security: Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space" seminar CLICK HERE
Print Version
Log in
All Rights Reserved© 2007, Liu Institute for Global Issues
Banner Photos by Lindsay Mackenzie
Design by BlendMedia