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Paul Evans
Professor, Liu Institute for Global Issues & Institute of Asian Research
Office: C.K. Choi Building, Office 251
Office Phone: (604) 822-4686
Email: paul.evans@ubc.ca
Fax: (604) 822-5207
Website: www.iar.ubc.ca/aboutus/iarfacultystaff/faculty/paulevans.aspx
  

Paul Evans (PhD Dalhousie) was appointed to the directorship of the Institute of Asian Research on 1 September 2009.

His previous teaching and administrative appointments were as Assistant, Associate and Professor, Department of Political Science, York University, 1981-97; Director, University of Toronto - York University Joint Centre for Asia Pacific Studies, 1991-96; Visiting Professor, Asia Center, Harvard University, 1997-99; Acting Director, Liu Institute for Global Issues, 2004-5; and Co-CEO and Chairman of the Executive Committee, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, 2005-08.

He has held visiting fellowships at the Australian National University (1988); National Chengchi University (1989); Chulalongkorn University (1989); the East-West Center (1995); and the National Institute for Research Advancement in Tokyo (1999).

He is finishing a book on Canada and global China. His earlier publications include:

  • John Fairbank and the American Understanding of Modern China (1988);
  • Reluctant Adversaries: Canada and the People's Republic of China 1949-1970 (1991) - a co-edited volume;
  • Studying Asia Pacific Security (1994) - an edited volume;
  • Beyond Boundaries: A Report on the State of Non-Official Dialogues on Peace, Security and Cooperation in South Asia (1997);
  • The Asia-Pacific Security Lexicon (2002 and, revised second edition, 2007) - with David Capie.

His current writing focuses on East Asian regionalism and Canada's Asia policy. Some of his recent essays include:

He served as Co-Chair of the Canadian Member Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in Asia Pacific from its founding in 1993 until July 1997 and from 1994 until June 1998, as co-chair of CSCAP's North Pacific Working Group. He was the founding director of the Canadian Consortium on Human Security in 2001-02. A member of the International Council of the Asia Society in New York and the Asia Pacific Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, he also sits on the editorial boards of The Pacific Review, Pacific Affairs, and The Chinese Journal of International Politics.

His complete academic vitae can be accessed here.

Publications:
Paul Evans
A new book by Paul Evans.
14 April 2014
 
Paul Evans
Professor Paul Evans writes the pro argument in the second of two mini-debates The Globe & Mail is hosting in advance of the June 17, 2011 Munk Debate on China’s role in the 21st century. The topic: Will the Chinese economy drive the global economic recovery?
15 June 2011
 
Paul Evans
While Prime Minister Stephen Harper's visit to China did not capture the world's attention, much less imagination. The real significance is that it happened at all and without serious disaster. It closed the chapter on "cool politics, warm economics" and reopened the engagement strategy of previous Canadian governments. Read more in this Op Ed by Professor Paul Evans.
11 December 2009
 
By Jennifer Ditchburn, Paul Evans
Paul Evans, an expert in Canada-China relations with UBC, comments on the Canadian government's approach to addressing a bloody clash between ethnic groups in China's Xinjiang territory. Evans says Canadians should expect ministers, not the prime minister, will do more of the talking on human-rights issues as the prime minister attempts to avoid commenting on issues of human rights and democracy. He said the Conservatives realized last year that a policy of "cool politics, warm economics" with China simply did not work. It had begun to hurt trade, and damaged their reputation domestically.
7 July 2009
Paul Evans
Professor Paul Evans recently spoke at a conference on "Bridging China Studies and International Relations Theory", in Singapore. S.R. Nathan, President of the Republic of Singapore also attended this conference (see photo). Prof. Evans presented this paper, of which a revised version will be published in spring 2010 in a volume edited by Zheng Yongnian. Please note: This is a Conference Draft and is not for citation or quotation without the author's permission.
12 June 2009
 
By Mark MacKinnon, Paul Evans
Kim Jong-un, the youngest son of North Korean Leader Kim Jong-il, looks set to inherit control of the nuclear-armed state. Observers say the upcoming transfer of power just might explain North Korea's behaviour in recent weeks and months, which has been belligerent and unpredictable. "This is a very different pattern than we've seen in past North Korean brinksmanship," said Paul Evans, a professor in the Liu Institute for Global Issues at UBC. "There must be internal turbulence around succession issues."
3 June 2009
Paul Evans
Paul Evans spoke at the Canadian International Council’s conference on “Canada and the Dominant Emerging Powers: Brazil, Russia, India and China (the BRIC)”, Cecil Green Park House, UBC, 29 May 2009.
29 May 2009
 
Paul Evans, By Campbell Clark
UBC Asia expert Paul Evans says China is looking from comforting signals from Canada as the two countries grapple with ways to build trust in their sometimes tense relations. That would include cultural visits, signs that disagreements over human rights can be "managed," and possible steps on two-way investment - China would like assurances that acquisitions of Canadian oil or mining interests by its state-owned firms will be treated like any other company's. "This is from the Chinese perspective - what they're expecting in step-by- step relations," Evans said. "It's a matter of a series of confidence- building measures in the lead-in to a visit."
18 May 2009
 
Paul Evans
Canadian International Trade Minister Stockwell Day has called his just-concluded trip to China a success, having launched two new trade offices in Chengdu and Shenzhen. Prof. Paul Evans of the Liu Institute for Global Studies at UBC, said Canada has to do more to encourage Chinese investment. He says the political and economic sides of diplomacy go hand in hand. "We have to get this back up to the highest level with the tone of dealing with issues of mutual interest with mutual respect," Evans said.
17 April 2009
 
Paul Evans
Paul Evans gave a luncheon speech to the Conference on “Political Change in China”, held at Trinity College, University of Toronto, in March 2009.
7 March 2009
 
Paul Evans
From the Edmonton Journal, Wed 18 Feb 2009. As Obama prepares to broaden U.S. relations with China, Canada must re-examine its own policies. And it should be heavily guided by Alberta.
18 February 2009
 
Paul Evans, By Shawn McCarthy
Paul Evans, a professor at UBC's Liu Institute for Global Issues and senior adviser to the Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada, says Canada faces an uphill battle in negotiating a proposed free-trade arrangement with India. Evans said concluding a traditional free-trade agreement should not be the main priority as the two countries expand their economic ties. "What we need is a New Economy relationship with India, not an old, trade-based relationship," he said.
21 January 2009
 
Paul Evans
26 November 2008
 
Paul Evans
From Monday's Globe and Mail, October 20, 2008 at 6:30 AM EDT
20 October 2008
 
Paul Evans
Canadian Foreign Policy, Vol. 14, No. 2 (Spring 2008), pp. 131-39
2 May 2008
Paul Evans, David Capie
The ending of the Cold War opened a new debate across the Pacific about the meaning of security and the new regional multilateral institutions that were beginning to emerge.
20 November 2007
 
Paul Evans
The project on "Rebuilding American Security" was funded by the Ford Foundation and organized by the Liu Institute for Global Issues in cooperation with partner institutions in Asia. The basic question informing the series was how democratization in Asia affects national security priorities, views of US security policy, and relations with the US.
3 July 2007
 
Paul Evans
Does multilateralism have a future in Northeast Asia, or is it an empty dream that tantalizes but inevitably disappoints? Is it like the Abbé de Saint-Pierre’s eighteenth-century conception of a European federation: highly desirable in theory but, at least in its time, unachievable in practice?
1 January 2007
 
Paul Evans
A contribution by Dr. Paul Evans, Co-CEO of the Asia Pacific Foundation, to the International Journal examining the impact of the rise of an economically powerful China on Canada and the way in which Canada has responded to this new relationship.
31 March 2006
 
Paul Evans
The workshop was the third and final in a series of meetings on "Rebuilding American Security" funded by the Ford Foundation and organized by the Liu Institute for Global Issues in cooperation with partner institutions in Asia. The basic question informing the series was how democratization in Asia affects national security priorities, views of US security policy, and relations with the US. It followed earlier meetings in Santa Monica and Seoul.
29 January 2006
 
Paul Evans
The workshop was the first in a series of three meetings on ”Rebuilding American Security“ funded by the Ford Foundation and organized by Paul Evans
9 September 2005
 
Paul Evans
The chapters in this volume share a common interest in the material forces of firm-driven trade, investement, and production that are deepening economic integration in proximate parts of continental and maritime Asia.
1 January 2005
 
Paul Evans
Paul Evans, Liu Institute Professor and Acting Director, spoke at Ivan Head's memorial service at the University of British Columbia, on Dec 13, 2004.
13 December 2004
 
Paul Evans
In the pantheon of new security concepts debated in East Asia in the past decade, human security is perhaps the most controversial.
30 June 2004
 
Paul Evans, Yuen Pau Woo
China has mattered deeply to Canadians for 130 years despite vast asymmetries in power, influence, and size, and abiding differences in culture, values, political system, and level of development.
29 April 2004
Currently Teaching:
See IAR profile.
Graduate Student Supervision:
Ph.D. committee member, Susanne Duska; M.A. committee member, second reader, Mrinalani Menon
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