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Brian Job
Faculty Associate, Liu Institute for Global Issues; Professor, Political Science; Associate Director, Institute of Asian Research
Office: Buchanan C406
Office Phone: (604) 822-4687
Email: bjob@interchange.ubc.ca
Website: www.politics.ubc.ca/about-us/faculty-members/bfont-color-blue-full-time-facultyfontb/brian-job.html
   

Brian Job (Ph.D, Indiana) joined the Department as a Professor in 1989. Since 1992, he has also served as Director of the Centre of International Relations at the Liu Institute at UBC.

His teaching and research interests are in international security studies, broadly conceived. His work focuses upon the evolving security order of the Asia Pacific, on intrastate conflict, and on Canadian foreign and defence policy. The theoretical/conceptual puzzles that interest him include the evolution of norms for security communities, multilateralism, regionalism, arms acquisition processes, and the security dilemmas of and within ”Third World“ states.

His current research is funded through a joint SSHRC project with Michael Wallace and through the Security and Defence Forum program of the Centre of International Relations. He has published on international alliances, international theory, and the application of formal and statistical methodologies to international relations.

In recent years, his publications have focused upon the UN and regional conflict, Asia Pacific security developments, and on Canadian interests and policies vis-à-vis the Asia Pacific. Job has actively engaged in establishing academic networks, including (as co-founder) the Canadian Consortium on Asia Pacific Security and the Canadian Consortium on Human Security. With the Asia Pacific region, he is involved in regional ”Track 2“ activities and currently serves as Co-Chair of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP 2002-04). Job served on the Foreign Minister’s Advisory Board (1995ð97). He was co-editor of the International Studies Quarterly, as well as Treasurer and Vice-President of the International Studies Association.

Publications:
 
Brian Job
Professor Brian Job writes about the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and its importance to Canada. “The Harper government, largely driven by the economic concerns of ‘swirling trade winds,’ has made ASEAN a priority for re-engagement,” he writes. “If sustained, Ottawa’s initiatives could mark the re-establishment of a meaningful Canadian presence in Southeast Asia,” writes Job. “However, past experience raises questions about Ottawa’s staying power and whether this flurry of activity will coalesce around a coherent, longer-term Asia agenda for Canada.”
8 August 2012
 
Brian Job, By Jeff David
The Liu Institute’s Professor Brian Job is quoted in an article in Embassy Foreign Policy Newspaper, which discusses how key phrases like "human security", "good governance" and "public diplomacy" are being discreetly removed from Canadian foreign policy.
1 July 2009
 
Brian Job
Professor Brian Job spoke to a session on "The Regional Security Architecture: Identifying Weaknesses and Reform" at the 23rd Asia-Pacific Roundtable in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 4 June 2009.
4 June 2009
Brian Job, Erin Williams
The Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP) is the region’s leading Track Two (non-official) organization for promoting cooperation and dialogue on regional security issues. CSCAP was established in 1993, and now has 21 national Member Committees and one Observer. (For more information about CSCAP, please visit www.cscap.org or www.cscap.ca.)
9 December 2008
Brian Job
The Conference of Defense Associations Institute, Vimy Paper 2008
16 May 2008
 
Brian Job
Job, Brian "The Evolving Asian and Global Security Order: What Role for Japan?" The Frank C. Langdon Memorial Symposium, November 2006.
15 November 2006
 
Brian Job, Alexander Moens, Lenard Cohen
Cohen, Lenard; Brian Job & Alexander Moens (editors). Foreign Policy Realignment in the Age of Terror. Canadian Institute of Strategic Studies, Toronto, 2003.
20 April 2003
Research:
  Canada International Council: Canada - China: Collaboration on Global Issues
The CIC's China project is to focus on building a policy framework for Canada's resumption of an effective partnership with China. The overall project has three thematic areas: 1) domestic institutional and normative contexts for engagement; 2) economic relations; 3) collaboration on global issues. Through the Centre of International Relations, Brian Job, has assumed the role of coordinator of the third theme, along with Pascale Massot (currently a PhD student in the Department of Political Science at UBC), serving as the project’s research assistant.
  Council for Security Cooperation in the Asian Pacific - Regional Security Outlook
The CSCAP Regional Security Outlook (CRSO), CSCAP's flagship publication is edited by Brian Job and Erin Williams of the CIR and published by the CIR for CSCAP. The CRSO mandate is to survey the most pressing security issues of today and to provide informed policy-relevant recommendations as to how Track One (official) and Track Two (non-official) actors, working together, can advance regional multilateral solutions to these issues.
  Climate Change and Security Project
Over the next 30 years, climate change will emerge as a global security concern of unprecedented scope and seriousness. Researchers at the Liu Institute for Global Issues have launched a research project which is exploring the security implications of climate change for Canada.
  The Climate Change-Security Nexus -- A Workshop
The potential security implications of climate change have received less attention in Canada than in many other countries. A January 28-29, 2010 workshop in Ottawa organized by a research team at the Liu Institute for Global Issues helped fill this gap.
Global Focus: On the Edges of Conflict
Armed conflict in the early 21st century tends to be asymmetrical and protracted, fought by an array of armed groups on both physical and political battlefields, and causing disproportionate suffering and death to civilians. The Edges of Conflict Project is working to better understand the nature of such conflict and to improve respect for the rule of law in complex security environments.
Currently Teaching:
See Political Science profile.
Graduate Student Supervision:
(n/a)
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